The Handmaid’s Tale-Margaret Atwood

Posted January 21st, 2011 by NuriRhines

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I literally just finished reading this amazingly awesome book about fifteen minutes ago. It’s a very interesting novel and raises a lot of questions about what men think the role of a woman is. The Handmaid’s tale is about Offred, a handmaid who lives in the Republic of Gilead. Her job is to provide a baby for her Commander and his mean old wife. She is not a loud to go out much and can only pray to get pregnant. In a society where women are forbidden to read and write, Offred struggles to adjust to her life. With flashbacks of the man she loved and her young daughter constantly reminding her of the normal life she had before, Offred wonders if she’ll be able to return to her formal life. This novel is seriously good. It’s like George Orwell’s 1984, but deals with women. Atwood is a talented writer who is able to draw the reader in with her poetic lines. There is one line in particular that gave me goosebumps. “I try not to think too much. Like other things now, thought must be rationed.” There were a lot of lines like this all throughout this beautiful novel. I couldn’t help thinking how I would react if I was restricted like Offred in the book. Not being able to write, or read. I would be so incredibly depressed because that is all I do. I can only hope that our society never decides to restrict women like this.

NuriRhines

I am a senior in high school and in my second year of college. I want to be a journalist and I love to read and write.

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